8 Best PSUs for RTX 3080 Ti in 2021

The RTX 3080 Ti is one of Nvidia’s mid-cycle upgrades that is in essence a considerably cheaper yet still overpriced RTX 3090 with half of the VRAM. In comparison to the RTX 3080, its considerably higher core count and slightly higher VRAM give you a bit more headroom for 4K gaming and heavy rendering tasks. That said, you would think the 3080 Ti requires a higher wattage power supply than the already power-hungry 3080, but that is not the case.

The RTX 3080 Ti has around 17% more CUDA cores than the RTX 3080 with 2 extra GB of GDDR6X VRAM and a higher TDP of 350W. But the RTX 3080 Ti still manages to keep the same 750W power supply requirement as the 3080. However, it didn’t hurt to get a PSU that gives you a bit more headroom in terms of wattage. Below, we’re going to take a look at some of the best PSUs for the RTX 3080 Ti.

Best PSUs for RTX 3080 Ti

1Corsair RM750

Corsair RM750, RM Series, 80 Plus Gold Certified, 750 W Fully Modular ATX Power Supply - Black

Verdict

The RM750 is one of the best choices for someone who wants an efficient and reliable 750W power source. It is ideal for most mainstream PC builds with the RTX 3080 Ti at their core.

Specifications

Form factor: ATX | Wattage: 750W | Efficiency rating: 80 Plus Gold | Modularity: Fully | Cooling: 140mm rifle bearing fan (HA1425M12F-Z) | Noise: Cybernetics A (20-25 dBA) | Warranty: 10 years

Benefits

  • Silent operation thanks to its low-noise rifle bearing fan
  • Efficient under low to medium loads
  • Compact size for improved case airflow

Drawbacks

  • Forced semi-passive operation mode due to the lack of a switch

The RM series is one of the most mainstream fully modular 80+ Gold PSUs. As a result, the design is minimalistic without any RGB lights and other bells and whistles. Unlike the previous generation of RM models, the new RM 750 sports a monotone color scheme without any colorful accents.

This power supply is compact with a 160mm-long casing, entirely modular, and does the job it’s supposed to do- power your computer. Nothing more, nothing less. Furthermore, Corsair increased the warranty from five years for the old series to ten years for this new generation of reliable PSUs.

As a Gold-rated power supply, the RM 750 displays some impressive performance despite the fairly low price. It can operate at full load for extended periods of time without having any overheating issues. The rifle bearing fan does a good job of keeping it cool without generating much noise. Additionally, when under low to medium load, active cooling isn’t required so the fan is automatically disabled.

This power supply is built for average gamers and PC users that need a powerful and efficient PSU. The value lies in performance, reliability, and modularity. For premium features, enthusiasts need to look elsewhere.

2EVGA SuperNOVA 750 P2

EVGA SuperNOVA 750 P2, 80+ PLATINUM 750W , Fully Modular , EVGA ECO Mode, 10 Year Warranty , Includes FREE Power On Self Tester, Power Supply 220-P2-0750-X1,Black

Verdict

The 750 P2 is a premium power supply with platinum efficiency and low ripple. It’s built using high-quality components, it’s fully modular, and it comes with an optional passive operation mode. This PSU offers everything a typical RTX 3080 Ti needs and more.

Specifications

Form factor: ATX | Wattage: 750W | Efficiency rating: 80 Plus Platinum | Modularity: Fully | Cooling: 140mm double ball-bearing fan | Noise: 18-36 dBA | Warranty: 10 years

Benefits

  • High performance overall
  • SIlent 140mm double ball-bearing fan
  • Semi-passive operation with an off/on switch

Drawbacks

  • Short distance between SATA and Molex connectors
  • Efficiency under light loads could be better

EVGA is a household PSU brand for many. The P2 line of power supplies is well-known for its quality, efficiency, and great features. However, the design may disappoint some enthusiasts due to the plain matte finish. It looks simple and uninteresting, but at least you can’t leave any visible fingerprints on it. You wouldn’t be able to tell that this is a premium product just by looking at the 750 P2. But don’t judge it by its appearance because it’s very misleading!

The SuperNOVA 750 P2 is built using high-end components, including Japanese capacitors that are famous for their reliability. It is capable of delivering full power up to 50 ℃ and its cooling is handled by a 140mm double ball-bearing fan. As expected, the P2 is also modular and comes with a semi-passive operation mode.

It’s important to note here that EVGA opted to install an ECO-mode switch for those of us that feel more comfortable knowing the fan is always working. Some competitors, like Corsair, don’t always make passive operation optional.

This is enthusiast-grade hardware with a reasonable price tag. There are better alternatives for PC users with tighter budgets or those who don’t want to pay extra for the Platinum rating. The 750 P2 is ideal for enthusiasts that want a powerful piece of hardware that is backed by a 10-year warranty.

3ASUS ROG Thor 850

ASUS ROG Thor 850 Certified 850W Fully-Modular RGB Power Supply with LiveDash OLED Panel

Verdict

The ROG Thor 850 is meant for gaming enthusiasts looking for a powerful but silent PSU with a unique design. Few power supplies look as good as the Thor and the OLED display truly sets it apart from the rest.

Specifications

Form factor: ATX | Wattage: 850W | Efficiency rating: 80 Plus Platinum | Modularity: Fully | Cooling: 135mm Double Ball Bearing Fan (PLA13525B12M) | Noise: Cybernetics A+ (15 dBA – 20 dBA) | Warranty: 10 years

Benefits

  • Semi-passive operation with an off/on switch
  • RGB lighting with Aura Sync compatibility
  • Unique design

Drawbacks

  • Bulky construction
  • OLED panel displays only power draw

ASUS managed the impossible. They managed to turn something as mundane as a power supply into something exciting. The design of the ROG Thor 850 is truly eye-catching, especially thanks to the OLED screen which is a unique touch. Too bad it can display only the wattage because it would’ve been cool to get other readings as well.

That said, this PSU isn’t just all looks. It’s a powerful piece of hardware that will give your system plenty of headroom. Plus it’s highly efficient with a Platinum rating and it’s fully modular. The ROG Thor 850 has all the features you want in a good PSU. It’s built using high-quality components, it’s impressively silent, can maintain full load for long periods without a problem, and the power readings on the OLED display are actually accurate.

If you’re looking for a high-grade PSU to go with an equally high-end RTX 3080 Ti, the ASUS ROG Thor is for you. It’s quite bulky and expensive, but it has everything you need and it’s going to make a great conversation starter as well.

4NZXT C750

NZXT C750 - NP-C750M - 750 Watt PSU - 80+ Gold Certified - Hybrid Silent Fan Control - Fluid Dynamic Bearings - Modular Design - Sleeved Cables - ATX Gaming Power Supply - 10 Year Warranty

Verdict

The C750 is a sleek-looking workhorse. It’s powerful enough for most RTX 3080 Ti systems, reliable, modular, and comes with a decent price tag. However, it can get a little noisy.

Specifications

Form factor: ATX | Wattage: 750W | Efficiency rating: 80 Plus Gold | Modularity: Fully | Cooling: 120mm Fluid Dynamic Bearing Fan (HA1225H12F-Z) | Noise: Cybernetics Standard++ (30 dBA – 35 dBA) | Warranty: 10 years

Benefits

  • Semi-passive operation with an off/on switch
  • Main cables are sleeved for durability and resistance to fraying
  • Stylish aesthetics

Drawbacks

  • Inefficient under light load
  • Noisy under heavy load

The C750 is an efficient piece of hardware that also impresses with a modern design. Most of the competition in its price range looks completely outdated. If you care about looks and want an all-black system without RGB, you’re going to like the C750’s matte black finish. This PSU is also compact and fits in any ATX case, leaving plenty of room for good airflow.

The C750 performs well at mid to high loads, however, if you’re sensitive to noise, there are quieter options out there. This power supply isn’t as silent as it could be, but it can run at its peak capacity for a long duration without overheating. The internal components are durable and the sleeved cables are highly resilient to heat. At low to medium loads, the semi-passive operation mode can be used without worrying about overheating issues.

NZXT’s C750 is a middle-of-the-pack PSU ideal for most systems. Users who want performance in a sleek package paired with a few premium features like passive mode and full modularity will be happy with this power supply.

5Corsair RM850

Corsair RM Series, RM850, 850 Watt, 80+ Gold Certified, Fully Modular Power Supply, Microsoft Modern Standby (CP-9020196-NA)

Verdict

The RM850 offers a lot of power for a fairly reasonable price. It’s a great option for those who want more PSU headroom.

Specifications

Form factor: ATX | Wattage: 850W | Efficiency rating: 80 Plus Gold | Modularity: Fully | Cooling: 140mm Rifle Bearing Fan (HA1425M12F-Z) | Noise: Cybernetics A- (25 dBA – 30 dBA) | Warranty: 10 years

Benefits

  • Highly efficient under light loads
  • Great performance for the price
  • Fully modular design

Drawbacks

  • Semi-passive mode can’t be deactivated
  • Noisier than the RMx version

Corsair’s RM850 shows that simplicity is a good thing for most of us. This is a powerful PSU that performs well overall. The design isn’t anything to marvel at, but for the price, it’s hard to complain. It’s compact, fully modular, and its plain black color suits most PC builds.

The RM850 offers a lot of power at a reasonable price. It’s highly efficient under light loads unlike most competitors in its class and its load regulation is excellent. It’s also quieter than most PSUs, even under heavy load. Also, it comes with a semi-passive operation mode, but for some reason, Corsair decided to not make it selectable. Some users aren’t fans of this feature, so having a switch is usually a nice touch.

The RM850 is a good choice for the average consumer. If you don’t want anything fancy, but still want power, efficiency, and a few nice-to-have features, then this PSU might be right for you. However, if your RTX 3080 Ti system isn’t extremely power-hungry, you can also go with the RM750 to save a few bucks.

6EVGA 750 GA

EVGA 220-GA-0750-X1 Super Nova 750 Ga, 80 Plus Gold 750W, Fully Modular, ECO Mode with Dbb Fan, 10 Year Warranty, Compact 150mm Size, Power Supply

Verdict

The 750 GA is a budget-friendly package that comes with a lot of value. It sports a modular design, 80 plus Gold efficiency rating, and is backed by a 10-year warranty. Not bad for the entry-level price tag. However, enthusiasts will be disappointed by the build quality.

Specifications

Form factor: ATX | Wattage: 750W | Efficiency rating: 80 Plus Gold | Modularity: Fully | Cooling: 135mm Double Ball Bearing | Noise: N/A | Warranty: 10 years

Benefits

  • Great performance for the price
  • Switchable ECO mode
  • Low ripple

Drawbacks

  • Low efficiency under light load
  • Can get noisy at full power

EVGA has quite a few PSU lines and it’s starting to confuse people. The GA series is only a couple of years old and it’s one of the budget-friendly ones. It’s not pretty to look at, but it does the job it’s made for. If you want something that visually stands out, you should check the ASUS ROG Thor series.

The 750 GA is a run-of-the-mill PSU that performs quite well, although it’s not as efficient under light loads as Corsair’s RM750. The internal components aren’t of the highest quality, which is expected with this class of PSUs, but EVGA believes in their product enough to back it with a 10-year warranty.

This PSU is for users who just want a power supply that works and nothing more. It’s not for enthusiasts. That said, the modularity, compact design, and overall performance make an attractive offer for those of us who are on a budget.

7Cooler Master V750

Cooler Master V750 SFX Gold Full Modular, 750W, 80+ Gold Efficiency, ATX Bracket Included, Quiet FDB Fan, SFX Form Factor, 10 Year Warranty

Verdict

The V750 is a modest SFX power supply that lacks premium features but is powerful and efficient enough for most RTX 3080 Ti systems.

Specifications

Form factor: SFX | Wattage: 750W | Efficiency rating: 80 Plus Gold | Modularity: Fully | Cooling: 135mm Fluid Dynamic Bearing Fan (APISTEK SAC4H2H) | Noise: Cybernetics Standard++ (30 dBA – 35 dBA) | Warranty: 10 years

Benefits

  • Budget-friendly but powerful SFX power supply
  • Thick 16 AWG PCI-e cables
  • Can be installed in an ATX case with the included ATX bracket

Drawbacks

  • Low efficiency under light load
  • Somewhat small distance between the connectors

SFX power supplies are finally becoming more powerful and more affordable. Cooler Master contributes to that with their V750. This compact black box is well-built and offers a satisfactory performance. However, its fan isn’t the best and under high load, it can get quite noisy. If you want a silent setup, skip this PSU.

Load regulation and efficiency at high temperatures are acceptable, however, the 750 isn’t as efficient under light loads. Overall, the performance levels fall in the middle of the pack category.

The V750 tends to run quite hot. While it works at maximum capacity quite well and efficiently, this is the reason why it quickly gets noisy. Even under medium loads, this PSU operates at higher temperatures than your typical midrange power supply. So, again, if noise is an issue for you, you’ll need an alternative.

Overall, the V750 is a budget-friendly PSU for users that want a small form factor build without paying premium rates. This power supply is a bit rough around the edges, but it’s powerful, modular, and the manufacturer offers a 10-year guarantee.

8EVGA 750 N1

EVGA 750 N1, 750W, 2 Year Warranty, Power Supply 100-N1-0750-L1

Verdict

The 750 N1 is one of the cheapest PSUs you can buy and it’s far from being an ideal choice. It’s terribly inefficient, cables aren’t modular, and it comes with a 2-year warranty when most power supplies are backed for 10 years. There are much better alternatives out there.

Specifications

Form factor: ATX | Wattage: 750W | Efficiency rating: 80 Plus White | Modularity: None | Cooling: 120mm rifle bearing fan | Noise: N/A | Warranty: 2 years

Benefits

  • Good 5VSB rail
  • Plenty connectors
  • Decent rifle bearing fan

Drawbacks

  • Low performance and inefficient
  • Low-quality capacitors
  • Noisy fan at high loads

The 750 N1 is a low-cost low-performance power supply. It’s very plain in design, lacks modularity completely, and doesn’t come with any special features. Performance-wise, it’s rated 80-Plus White for efficiency. This is the lowest rating a PSU can have, so it might not be something you’d want to pair with a power-hungry RTX 3080 Ti. Its construction feels cheap, especially since it doesn’t come with high-quality Japanese capacitors as most power supplies do. And while the rifle bearing fan is of decent quality when it comes to actual cooling, it starts making quite a bit of noise when the PSU is forced to deliver full power.

EVGA’s 750 N1 is for people on extremely low budgets or for those who seek a simple power supply for an office PC. It is not efficient or reliable enough for a demanding RTX 3080 Ti setup. Despite delivering 750W, which fits the 3080’s PSU requirement, it’s unreliable and wastes a lot of power. There are much better alternatives at a slight price increase. For example, NZXT’s C750 still falls in the budget-friendly category, but it’s reliable, Gold-rated for efficiency, modular, and guaranteed to work for 10 years. The N1 comes with a suspicious 2-year warranty, which is out of the ordinary, especially in 2021.

Final Thoughts

Power supplies are often ignored when it comes to features and budget. Many gamers choose the cheapest option that delivers the required power. However, that’s not enough if you want your system to treat you well over the years. Pay careful attention to the efficiency rating, build quality, cooling system, and warranty. Most Gold-rated 750W power supplies that manufacturers trust enough to back with a 10-year warranty are a solid choice. It all depends on how much you’re willing to spend on design and premium features.

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